matte black car 12

matte black car 12
impression matte black car 12
photograph matte black car 12

The problem here is in the wording. If you consider taking care of a “regular” (non-matte) car hard, then sure, maintaining a matte car might be tough for you. Chances are if you’re on this blog you care about your car and how it looks, and with that said, chances are you understand where I’m coming from here. Taking care of a matte painted car is no more work than properly caring for a glossy car. By the way, the mere fact that you’ll never be polishing your matte car makes it that much easier to care for. Matte finishes are way less susceptible to clear coat scratches and swirl marks simply because the matte finish is non-reflective. If you know about the science of scratches, you also know that when there’s no light to reflect off a scratch the human eye has a hard time really seeing it. Myth tackled.


Dish soap is formulated to do one thing (unless you use that brand that moisturizes your hands), and that thing is to strip grease and grime off of hard surfaces (ie. plates, glass, etc.). As you now know, you can most certainly protect matte paint – using dish soap to clean the car will weaken the bond of any sealant or substance on the painted surface of your car. So in a sense it may not do damage to the paint, but it’s certainly doing more than just cleaning it. Do yourself (and your matte finish) a favor and get a no-shine matte car wash soap that uses no fillers, no silicone, and won’t strip your matte paint of its layer of protection.


Black Matte Car Paint or Hot Rod Black as it is commonly referred to has been around for more than fifty years. Over the last decade Hot Rod Black and other low gloss Hot Rod Flatz style colors have seen dramatic increases in popularity to the point that some, particularly the black, are considered a main stream color.  In fact, many car manufacturers from Ford to Lamborghini are now offering low gloss matte car paint or satin black color options on new vehicles.  We have invested a lot of time and technical resources into creating a line of durable, low gloss, hot rod flatz colors and clearcoats in four different gloss sheens to suit a wide range of personal preferences.  Unlike other companies that promote primers as their low gloss paint colors, we have built a durable, UV resistant, 2K urethane finish designed specifically for use as a low gloss urethane topcoat.


Gone are the days when every car owner sought to have his or her car paint shine and gleam. Today, matte finish (also known as flat finish) is a rising trend in the automotive world. Should you consider a matte painted car, it is very important to arm yourself with information. Below are five common car paint problems you most probably will run into if you choose matte finish.


Absolutely not. In rare cases, maybe your aftermarket matte paint job has no clear coat, but if you get it from the factory it definitely will. In fact, it’s actually the clear coat that makes factory matte paint look flat with its microscopic imperfections and “dimples” (read more). If you got your car or motorcycle painted matte in a booth by a third-party, I recommend making sure they put on a matte clear coat over the pigment layer of paint. Without a clear coat your messing with fire.


Ehhh, not quite. Not sure where this one started from, but I guess everybody speculates on exotic items and that they aren’t built to last. Matte paint, if it’s from the manufacturer, is absolutely designed to last the entire life of the car. Going back to Myth #3, that’s why we put clear coat on our cars – longterm protection for the pigment layer of paint. Because most matte paint does in fact use a clear coat layer, the only thing you have to worry about is protecting that clear coat layer with a matte paint sealant.


J, I certainly understand your concern being in Florida. Simply put, you really want to avoid allowing the substance (bugs, sap, bird droppings) to harden. If it does harden, you’re really going to have a tough time trying to get whatever it is off with Matte Final Finish. In that case you’ll have to get Matte Paint Cleanser out during the car’s next wash to remove anything stubborn. Bottom line, if bugs are on the surface for a day or two it’s not going to ruin the paint, but we do recommend removing anything from the surface as soon as you can. Just remember to always keep your matte finish protected and you’ll be okay. Hope this helps! – James


Range, Thanks for reading and your comment! I assume you’re talking about washing a matte car, in which case you have a few options. First is to find a reputable hand car wash that will use the appropriate products (more and more are popping up everyday). Second, yes, a wash bay would work fine so long as you avoid using the chemicals and tools they provide (you never know what’s in there). Lastly, just wash in your driveway – obviously this weighs heavily on where you live and the weather. There are other options that professionals use, such as inflatable wash bays, but this can be tough to get into your garage depending on the available space. At the end of the day, don’t bring it through a drive-through car wash. The brushes, the chemicals – none of it is good for matte paint, but interestingly enough, it’s terrible for glossy paint, too. The choice is up to you. Let me know if you have anymore questions! James


Busted. While this may have been the case when matte paint first emerged into the automotive marketplace, it certainly is not the case today. At the same time, this myth does make sense if and only if the protection product uses fillers, silicones, or any type of wax. So what’s that mean? It means the only (effective) way to protect matte paint is with a liquid matte paint sealant specifically formulated not to increase the surface’s gloss rating.


These colors can be sprayed on or the car can be wrapped with vinyl. This video tutorial is going to demonstrate how to prep, mix, and spray a single stage matte black. Then I discovered a trick for a custom effect I will share with you as well. I also included a video discussing Matte Clear Coats.


If only I had a dime for every instance I’ve heard this one. Trust me, dealerships are good for just about one thing: selling you a car… and most of them are terrible at doing that. They did not manufacture your car, they are not related to the development company who created the paint, and they definitely don’t read the entire manual before telling you how many miles your car should go without an oil change. Leave the paint care to professionals who understand the science behind matte paint and not those who only get paid if and when you purchase the car from them. Face it, most dealerships are rigorously trained to say “yes” no matter the customer’s question. Think about it… does this model have ABS? “Yes, for an extra $3,200.” You get my point.


Anyway, when all is said and done, if you’re lucky enough to own a matte car… it needs specific attention. There are things you should know and things you should avoid. There are secrets and tips, and believe me there are a whole bunch of knuckle heads online who’ll take any theory that pops in their head and post it to a forum as advice. The bottom line is trust the experts – that’s why we’re here. Whether you drive a 2004 Subaru WRX or a matte C63 AMG, we can help… just email myteam@drbeasleys.com, comment below, or ask us on facebook to get your answers straightened out once and for all.


I certainly understand your concern being in Florida. Simply put, you really want to avoid allowing the substance (bugs, sap, bird droppings) to harden. If it does harden, you’re really going to have a tough time trying to get whatever it is off with Matte Final Finish. In that case you’ll have to get Matte Paint Cleanser out during the car’s next wash to remove anything stubborn. Bottom line, if bugs are on the surface for a day or two it’s not going to ruin the paint, but we do recommend removing anything from the surface as soon as you can.


Hey MRALBERTO1, sorry to hear about the stain. Good thing you got to the sap as soon as you did. Without seeing the car I can’t say for sure, but we’ve had success with getting sap stains out before with our Matte Paint Cleanser. You’ll want to spray it on there, let it dwell (not dry) and wipe it off with a microfiber cloth. Repeat as necessary if the stain is still there. The Cleanser is formulated for matte paint so it won’t hurt the paint, but it’s more aggressive than just soap and water so it will have a much better chance.

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